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Gender Stereotyping at Work (STEM) and in the Toy Aisle

Good recent articles get us wondering once again what is nature and what is nurture:

  1. How Gender Stereotyping Impacts Women in STEM”
  2. Wal-Mart, Toys R Us, and now Target are removing gender-based labels from its toy shelves.

 

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LiveRamp + Acxiom !

Acxiom announced it is acquiring LiveRamp for $310 million: Acxiom Press Release

See a video of Acxiom CEO, Scott Howe, and LiveRamp CEO, Auren Hoffman, talking about the combination: LiveRamp Blog Post

 

New Graduate Resume and Networking Tips:

I attended a Speed Networking event at San Francisco State University, and put together some quick tips for new grads getting ready to look for their first full time job. Let me know if you have some basics to add:

  1. Include all skills: specific programs and generic program names. Important for recruiter resume searches and brief resume review by a hiring manager.
    CRM, Salesforce
    Project Management Software, Primavera P6
    PowerPoint, Prezi, Presentation Software
  2. Many hiring managers are extremely judgmental of spelling, punctuation, resume formatting, alignment, etc. Have others review your work. Print it and look at it with fresh eyes.
  3. Include work samples if applicable: an online portfolio (art or webdev), code samples (software), project pictures, writing sample, CAD sample, process improvement, etc.
  4. Industry experience, ex: Digital Marketing, Mobile Applications, Retail Sales, Nonprofit
  5. List work or internship experience.
    Give a reference name for each, but no contact information. Let them call you for that, but they may recognize the name.
  6. $$, ##’s: Have you been part of a project that saved money or boosted numbers? Be specific….
    How you changed a process, introduced a new vendor, created a social presence that drove new sales, etc.
  7. What did you own on a project, or significanly impact?
  8. Cut out words like “helped” and “assisted” wherever possible and be more detailed on your contribution.
  9. List your key or specialty courses (ex: Cognitive Psychology, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning)
  10. List professors in key courses who can be references.
  11. List volunteer activities, and give reference names.
  12. Hobbies: List some that may be related to the job, or which give a sense of your personality. Sports show you are healthy, can work on teams, and are likely healthy.
  13. Line up your references and let them know when they may be expecting a call. They also may have other job opportunity suggestions for you! Keep a list of your references on GoogleDocs for easy, timely sharing. Do not OVERUSE or over-introduce these people – only share full reference contact detail when a hiring manager is serious about considering you for a position.
    Include:
    –Name
    –Current Company/Title
    –Company/Title/Relationship when you worked together -or- School/Class
    –Phone (work, mobile)
    –Email
    –Time Zone
    –Best time/way to contact
  14. LinkedIn.com – Use It!!! Make sure it is consistent with your resume.
    –Link with interesting people: parents of friends, professors, students, work/intern colleagues, recruiters, neighbors.
    –Actively continue linking – calendar time to touch LinkedIn once per week.
    –Request recommendations and post them.
    –Search for contacts at the companies you are interested in. Ask for introductions through your connections.
    Call people for informational interviews.
    –Search for recruiters and HR personnel at the companies you are interested in. Link with and contact them.
    –Track these contacts, your contact attempts and methods, dates, and repeat at least monthly.
    –Gather company information.
    –Look at job postings on LinkedIn.
    –Join groups.
    –Set alerts for news from companies you are interested in: Also do this on Google.
  15. Meetup.com – search for your specialty/industry; then join, attend, network, connect, and link.
  16. Scan the online job boards (Craig’s List, Indeed.com, Dice, etc.), or search online for keyword combos and the word “job” or “apply”. If you apply, personalize your resume submission with a letter that targets your matching points to the job requirements.
  17. Online Community Participation: write or participate on blogs; write reviews for books in your field online (ie: on Amazon); ask questions on LinkedIn and Meetup groups; join open source or coding groups, etc.
  18. Learn about a company before you interview. TechCrunch, LinkedIn, Google it, industry magazines, contact people there for informational interviews, etc.

New Grads: “Want a Job? Get an Internship First!”

Interesting short podcast from American Pulic Media – Marketplace on Education.
http://www.marketplace.org/topics/economy/education/want-job-get-internship-first#.UTvCX_ebaBo.email

This story emphasizes the heightened Importance of internships in today’s job market to bridge the gap between your college degree and your first job. Hiring managers are far more likely to consider new grads with experience working with others, collaborating on a team, and solving real problems. Experiential learning is weighed more heavily by some than grades and college name. Hiring managers are increasingly finding that even those exiting a good school with a “practical” degree struggle without the real-life test-drive of teaming, communication, and collaboration.

Employers claim that colleges are doing a fair to poor job today of preparing successful employees. I have to wonder of some of this disappointment is exacerbated by our societal shift toward texting as a primary form of communication. SO much critical work is still best shared and communicated by phone and in person, in my experience.

Employers’ advice: Work on interviewing skills and study up on the organization and industry you are applying to. A degree alone with good grades from a good school should be accompanied by an internship to show your “practical” side. Solid writing and communication skills, adaptability, teaming, decision-making, and problem-solving abilities are the gold standard.

As a recruiter, I know that internships also frequently turn into job opportunities after graduation, and will start your career networking and reference connections.

If you are a college student majoring in computer science, math, or information systems interested in an internship, do contact me for an opportunity in San Francisco / Bay Area!

Job Skills and Job Opening Mismatch: What’s Your Major?

Marilyn Geewax, NPR’s Senior Business Editor, stated today on a TV news program that 30% of our unemployment today was due to a skills mismatch with available job openings. This mismatch, and the void of job training (or pursuit of that training), are key issues today.

In my specific industry view as a technical recruiter focused heavily on software development, I am always surprised by how few of U.S. students seriously pursue computer science as a major: Especially women, as CS is such a great salary equalizer. You cannot fake passion for CS, but if you have not explored it as an option, you may be seriously selling yourself short!

I can place a CS major, straight out of school with a bachelor’s degree from a top school in CS (Berkeley, Stanford, MIT, Cornell, UCLA, USC, CalTech, Columbia, Carnegie Mellon, Princeton, etc.), in a job starting between $80k and 90k (sometimes more) with full benefits. Much of my day recruiting for senior engineers is spent talking with people from India, China, Russia, and other countries who have known this for a while and are happy to fill the demand here in California and other US states. Silicon Valley is now one of the greatest melting pots of people and ideas you will ever see.

There are plenty of kids playing on ipods, pocketing Android phones, gaming, doing homework assignments on GoogleDocs, using search engines for school research projects, Skyping with their friends, etc. How about learning some Objective-C, Java, Android programming, UI development, Lucene, and other technologies underlying all of those great things?

The new LG Optimus 3D Android Smartphone

Henry Nho, 3D evangelist at LG Mobile, showed the Silicon Valley Android Meetup Group  LG’s soon-to-be-released Optimus 3D smartphone last night.  With its dual camera configuration and nice integration with YouTube, we will be able to take 3D video and easily and upload to YouTube 3D!  3D tagging is automatic – no cumbersome upload process. You can connect the Optimus to 3D TV and laptops as well.

“Dual” has some significance in this product:  dual cores, channels, memory as well as the cameras. The Optimus 3D has a slidebar control for dynamic depth control.  They claim the battery life is good (but only testing will tell).

This phone is initially launching with FroYo, but will quickly upgrade to Gingerbread. It was fun to watch sci-fi video with a squid-like creature suddenly surprising me in the foreground.  One concern – be cautious not to drop the phone when surprised!  This definitely makes mobile gaming more fun.  Don’t know how long my eyes will want to keep up with the 3D challenge, but it is button-easy to switch between the two modes.  Kids, gamers, and personal video enthusiasts are going to be all over this.

Henry Nho is a very good speaker, and will challenge you to stump him with technology questions.  He gave us a great presentation including how 3D works, methods for combating “cross-talk” issues in 3D, camera separation distances, optimal viewing distance considerations for different devices, degree-of-sight ranges for your eye vs a camera, and more.  I recommend him highly for presentations.

See this smartphone on a YouTube video from Google IO:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZHwrSZ8xMg