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Before you Interview – Watch & Try!

Amy Cuddy’s research on body language reveals that we can change other people’s perceptions — and even our own body chemistry — simply by changing body positions. I recommend watching this TED talk at least twice, and trying this before your next interview, difficult 1:1, job review or salary negotiation, meeting a new colleague at work, key meeting, or any other important engagement. Bring on your best!

#powerPosing @amyjccuddy

 

Anaplan Runs Together in Paris and San Francisco!

SF ‪#‎BridgetoBridge‬ race and the ‪#‎WeRunParis‬ race.
(click photos below to see Paris pictures)

Anaplan Bridge to Bridge Anaplan Bridge-to-Bridge 2015 cropped

Gender Stereotyping at Work (STEM) and in the Toy Aisle

Good recent articles get us wondering once again what is nature and what is nurture:

  1. How Gender Stereotyping Impacts Women in STEM”
  2. Wal-Mart, Toys R Us, and now Target are removing gender-based labels from its toy shelves.

 

Ascendify’s Insider Portal – Would You Opt In To A Talent Pool?

Rather than applying directly through a job board to a specific role at a company, would you be willing introduce yourself generally to a company with your Facebook or LinkedIn profile, or your traditional resume, and invite them to contact you when they have a fit?  You are able to express your interest much more rapidly, but is there less connection or more connection going this route for you as a candidate? For context, read about Ascendify’s proposed approach and who is trying it out – http://bit.ly/1rDDBZM

2013 PayScale College ROI Report

2013 PayScale College ROI Report

New Graduate Resume and Networking Tips:

I attended a Speed Networking event at San Francisco State University, and put together some quick tips for new grads getting ready to look for their first full time job. Let me know if you have some basics to add:

  1. Include all skills: specific programs and generic program names. Important for recruiter resume searches and brief resume review by a hiring manager.
    CRM, Salesforce
    Project Management Software, Primavera P6
    PowerPoint, Prezi, Presentation Software
  2. Many hiring managers are extremely judgmental of spelling, punctuation, resume formatting, alignment, etc. Have others review your work. Print it and look at it with fresh eyes.
  3. Include work samples if applicable: an online portfolio (art or webdev), code samples (software), project pictures, writing sample, CAD sample, process improvement, etc.
  4. Industry experience, ex: Digital Marketing, Mobile Applications, Retail Sales, Nonprofit
  5. List work or internship experience.
    Give a reference name for each, but no contact information. Let them call you for that, but they may recognize the name.
  6. $$, ##’s: Have you been part of a project that saved money or boosted numbers? Be specific….
    How you changed a process, introduced a new vendor, created a social presence that drove new sales, etc.
  7. What did you own on a project, or significanly impact?
  8. Cut out words like “helped” and “assisted” wherever possible and be more detailed on your contribution.
  9. List your key or specialty courses (ex: Cognitive Psychology, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning)
  10. List professors in key courses who can be references.
  11. List volunteer activities, and give reference names.
  12. Hobbies: List some that may be related to the job, or which give a sense of your personality. Sports show you are healthy, can work on teams, and are likely healthy.
  13. Line up your references and let them know when they may be expecting a call. They also may have other job opportunity suggestions for you! Keep a list of your references on GoogleDocs for easy, timely sharing. Do not OVERUSE or over-introduce these people – only share full reference contact detail when a hiring manager is serious about considering you for a position.
    Include:
    –Name
    –Current Company/Title
    –Company/Title/Relationship when you worked together -or- School/Class
    –Phone (work, mobile)
    –Email
    –Time Zone
    –Best time/way to contact
  14. LinkedIn.com – Use It!!! Make sure it is consistent with your resume.
    –Link with interesting people: parents of friends, professors, students, work/intern colleagues, recruiters, neighbors.
    –Actively continue linking – calendar time to touch LinkedIn once per week.
    –Request recommendations and post them.
    –Search for contacts at the companies you are interested in. Ask for introductions through your connections.
    Call people for informational interviews.
    –Search for recruiters and HR personnel at the companies you are interested in. Link with and contact them.
    –Track these contacts, your contact attempts and methods, dates, and repeat at least monthly.
    –Gather company information.
    –Look at job postings on LinkedIn.
    –Join groups.
    –Set alerts for news from companies you are interested in: Also do this on Google.
  15. Meetup.com – search for your specialty/industry; then join, attend, network, connect, and link.
  16. Scan the online job boards (Craig’s List, Indeed.com, Dice, etc.), or search online for keyword combos and the word “job” or “apply”. If you apply, personalize your resume submission with a letter that targets your matching points to the job requirements.
  17. Online Community Participation: write or participate on blogs; write reviews for books in your field online (ie: on Amazon); ask questions on LinkedIn and Meetup groups; join open source or coding groups, etc.
  18. Learn about a company before you interview. TechCrunch, LinkedIn, Google it, industry magazines, contact people there for informational interviews, etc.

STEM and Computer Science Gender Gap

Here are some interesting links to reasons for the gender gap in STEM and computer science, and how Harvey Mudd College is successfully addressing it.

 

PBS interview with Markia Klawe regarding STEM and the gender gap:
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/04/stemchat-why-arent-more-women-in-science-and-engineering.html

 

Encouraging Women to Consider Computer Science: Harvey Mudd Successes
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/03/science/giving-women-the-access-code.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

 

Interview with Harvey Mudd President Maria Klawe on Women in STEM:
http://onedublin.org/2011/09/10/harvey-mudd-college-president-maria-klawe-on-women-in-science-math-and-engineering/

 

Harvey Mudd College CS statistics:
http://www.cs.hmc.edu/~alvarado/papers/fp068-alvarado.pdf